It’s All “Home” Work

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Erik Moledor and Robyn Hakanson with birthday-party baked goods and kids, l-r: James, Payton, and Caroline

Chance and choice have played sparring roles in the lives of Robyn Hakanson ’91 and Erik Moledor ’92.

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By John Syme

He was an Ohio math major and Wildcat football star who won the Tommy Peters Award, Davidson’s highest athletic honor. She was a New Jersey psych major and head athletic trainer.

“I taped his wrist,” she recalls of their first meeting.

They married in Davidson College Presbyterian Church right out of school and began pursuing careers in their respective fields. They went first to Duke and then to New York City, he in business consulting at Price Waterhouse Coopers and she in orthopedic surgery at Beth Israel Medical Center. By the time daughter Payton arrived in 1999, Moledor was traveling a lot. “I missed the second year of her life, for a job that promised more of the same.”

When Hakanson’s work took them to Colorado, Moledor found himself “temporarily” fulfilling the duties of house-husband. When he found it made him really, really happy, they made the arrangement permanent.

“I prefer the term ‘trophy husband,’” Moledor says.

“I should never have called him that, even once,” Hakanson sighs.

They’ve added two more children and another unconventional choice to their family dynamic: home-schooling. James, 4, rockets back and forth to Dad’s chair in the corner of their home in Mount Airy, N.C. Caroline, 6, is content to sit near Mom for a while. Payton, 11, perches on the sofa arm, poised for repartee after a morning’s lessons with Dad.

“Did you do your homework?” “It’s all ‘home’ work, Mom.” “Is your dad a good teacher?” [Dramatic pause] “I’ve had better.”

All in good fun. Conversation is lively and well-mannered all around. The parents attribute an especially strong family bond to the home-schooling, and to the chances it gives them as a family.

“It’s freed us,” says Moledor.

He’s studying Latin alongside—okay, just a bit ahead of—Payton. He’s on a local charter school board, attends education retreats, and keeps up with the state curriculum and testing requirements. And taxies to art, dance, piano, and activities at their Catholic church.

The cumulative freedoms of chance and choice extend to life lessons outside the family, like Hakanson’s work for Women Orthopaedist Global Outreach (WOGO), a medical-mission organization she cofounded. Or his chance to continue studies to round out some of the liberal arts disciplines he only sampled at Davidson.

Chances—and choices—of a lifetime.

Photo Credit: Bill Giduz

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